The Fed Plans Accordingly

But mouse-friend, you are not alone
In proving foresight may be vain;
the best laid schemes of Mice and Men
go oft awry,
and leave us only grief and pain,
or promised joy!

Please plan accordingly. Wiser words, you say? The Bard would beg to differ. No, not Shakespeare. The other bard, Scotland’s Robert Burns, the Ploughman Poet and Scotland’s Favorite Son. To say Burns was prolific is an affront given the catalogue of literary masterpieces written before his death at age 37. But most agree, To A Mouse, the tail end of which I’ve shared, was his most profound and greatest work. The eldest of seven children, Burns grew up a farmer in the middle of Scotland’s damp, frigid heartland. The severity of the manual labor required, jostled as he was from one farm to the next, left him with a premature stoop and a compromised constitution. Above all else, the raw pain in Burns’ words convey the hopelessness of hardship that has no end, the chill that settles into your soul as life’s best laid schemes corrode into embittered aspirations of youth that passes you by.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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The Roaring 20s —  Can Millenials Grow the U.S. Economy?

Before the football game of 1875 that would go on to simply be “The Game,” there were the Clubs. The Harvard Club of New York City was founded by five graduates in 1865. The Old Yale Alumni Association of New York followed three years later. Though the annual Harvard dinner at Delmonico’s must have been quite the sight, the growth that followed soon exhausted the option of renting space to house the Clubs. To accommodate its expanding membership, Harvard opened its first clubhouse at 29 West 44th Street in 1894. Six years on, Yale opened its first location next door, at 30 West 44th Street. Whether resolute determination to dominate or not, the Yale Club’s second and permanent home at 50 Vanderbilt Avenue was when it opened in 1915, and remains today, the world’s largest private club. And though disputed, the club is said to be deliberately built near the site of Yale 1773 graduate Nathan Hale’s execution during the Revolutionary War.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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The Way to Want, Danielle Dimartino Booth of Quill Intelligence

The Way to Want — The Politics of Economics

“What is a butterfly?
At best, He’s but a caterpillar dressed.
The gaudy fop’s his picture just, as Poor Richard says. 

But what madness must it be to run in debt for these superfluities! We are offered, by the terms of this vendue (public auction), six months’ credit; and that perhaps has induced some of us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, and hope now to be fine without it. But, ah, think what you do when you run in debt; you give to another power over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you will be ashamed to see your creditor; you will be in fear when you speak to him, you will make poor pitiful sneaking excuses, and by degrees come to lose you veracity, and sink into base downright lying; for, as Poor Richard says, the second vice is lying, the first is running in debt. And again, to the same purpose, lying rides upon debt’s back…When you have got your bargain, you may, perhaps, think little of payment; but creditors, Poor Richard tells us, have better memories than debtors, and in another place says… the borrower is a slave to the lender, and the debtor to the creditor, disdain the chain, preserve your freedom; and maintain your independency: be industrious and free; be frugal and free. At present, perhaps, you may think yourself in thriving circumstances, and that you can bear a little extravagance without injury; but,

For age and want, save while you may;
No morning sun lasts a whole day.” 

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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Apocalypse Later — “Someday this war on investor’s gonna end …”

Lt. Col. Bill Kilgore’s best on-screen moment did not end with the utterance of “napalm,” that soul-searing substance that still lingers in the minds of a troubled generation. No, his words were not powerful for the overt horror elicited, but for their resigned sense of hopelessness, the disquiet induced as his speech to his troops trails off, “Someday this war’s gonna end…”

Speak to veterans of Vietnam and they will tell you the deeply divisive war did not have to end as it did. I’m proud to be related to one of the soldiers who fought valiantly and with honor. What went wrong is sadly straightforward. Without getting swept up in politics, from a purely strategic perspective, Americans did not hold the ground they’d won. “Search and destroy” missions required U.S. soldiers to take enemy territory, in many cases destroying its livability in the process, and move on to the next target. The Viet Cong were pushed out but for a moment — as soon as American patrols left the area, they would return and rebuild with more reinforcements and win the confidence of the South Vietnamese in the process. Worse yet, American soldiers would rebuild a bridge the enemy had destroyed and promptly abandon it to be blown to bits once again.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth, Quill Intelligence, GERMANY ECONOMIC REUNIFICATION3

Germany’s Economic Reunification — Can China Save the Global Reflation Trade?

Will the real Easter please stand up? Roughly one-in-three inhabitants of our shared planet can tell you that “on the third day” after the crucifixion, Jesus rose from the dead and ascended into heaven. They can also tell you what preceded the crucifixion — the Last Supper. That particular breaking of unleavened bread also happened to be a Passover feast, which marks the Jewish Exodus from slavery in Egypt. Or at least, that’s the version conveyed in Matthew, Mark and Luke. There was blanket agreement among the earliest Christians that what followed the ultimate sacrifice — life itself and new beginnings — should be commemorated. As for the day Easter would be celebrated, time would bring controversy.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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The Restoration of Fed Independence

It’s been said that money can’t buy you happiness, but once in those distant dark ages, for the right price, it could come close. No matter how vile your vice or worldly your pleasure, absolution was just a pardon away — a few extra coins, and voila, more time to imbibe. It was enough to make a sinner smile. You see, the medieval Catholic church was in an expensive expansion mode, erecting throughout Europe and the British Isles, massive monuments to God which served as satellite seats of power. A shift in architectural norms was also heralding engineering feats that invited cathedrals to literally kiss the heavens. Under such circumstances, tithing fell short. Bishops, Rome’s representatives throughout Christendom, were thus commandeered to bridge the fiscal divide. These sons of nobles, educated in elite universities, fluent in Latin and consecrated into continuous apostolic succession were possessed of a power without end. Even monarchs were required to take orders from and consult with their respective bishops on everyday affairs of state. While bishops’ levying taxes on the peasantry fed Rome’s coffers, hawking ‘indulgences’ proved more lucrative yet.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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The New Unicorns on the Block

Few legends have had humbler beginnings than that of the unicorn. In fact, the literary introduction of this wondrous creature was met not with fanfare and adulation but  with such derision that the author of the beast became nothing if not Ancient Greece’s answer to literary mockery.  Adding self inflicted insult to the chronicler’s injury, was the reality of what we think of as an otherworldly, graceful beast being nothing more than a large, wild ass. Unknowingly, Ctesias, the much-mocked ancient author, did the greatest kindness to artists, dreamers and little girls through the ages by immortalizing the unicorn in his mid-fifth century B.C. Indica. Until Alexander the Great launched his ill-fated campaign to conquer India in 326 B.C., the book would stand as the only written account of life north of Persia. In Indica, Ctesias relayed other incredulous beings such as the Skiopolae, a ginormous people whose feet were so big they could be used as shelter from the elements, and the martikhora, a red creature with the face of a man, three rows of teeth and a scorpion’s stinger on its tail. (There were also mundane accounts of massive mountains, a.k.a. the Himalayas, and creatures of indescribable proportions, which were in fact, elephants.)

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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Extreme Road Tripping — QI on Q2 and Beyond

It started with Tarzan, or at least Johnny Weismuller, who would later portray him on the big screen. Young Johnny was the star of the 1924 Olympics, where he won three gold medals for swimming, including the 100-meter freestyle in under one minute, a first. The venue, the Piscine des Tourelles introduced the first of its kind 50-meter Olympic-sized swimming pool and featured space to hold 8,000 spectators. The spectacle was a huge hit.

Within four years, a small Florida town had built its own Olympic-sized swimming pool which spawned two Olympians – Elbert Root and Katherine Rawls. By 1938, college coaches, especially those on colder campuses lacking indoor pools, had taken note of the idyllic aquatic venue. Seizing the opportunity on behalf of its 17,000 inhabitants, August Burghard, the town’s Chamber of Commerce director, and Al Gordon, manager of the municipal pool, invited college swim teams to escape the chill by taking part in the inaugural College Coaches’ Swim Forum.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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Idling the Global Growth Engine – The Auto Super-Cycle Shifts into Neutral

Vanderbilt. The mere mention of the name conjures the very embodiment of the word “wealth.” Cornelius Vanderbilt was the great-great grandson of an indentured servant who emigrated to New York from the Netherlands in 1650. Born into poverty on Staten Island in 1794, he quit school at the age of 11 to work on his father’s ferry. From this meager stock arose The Commodore, a title Vanderbilt would command for the rest of his life, not for attaining the highest rank in the then U.S. Navy, but rather in deference to his earned stature as a shipping magnate. Not resting on his laurels, then came the building of a railroad empire crowned with the culmination of his vision, the Grand Central Depot. Adjusted for inflation, Vanderbilt’s $100 million estate would be worth upwards of $215 billion today.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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Powell v Pandora The Containment of Bond Market Volatility

Powell v Pandora – The Containment of Bond Market Volatility

It was the gift that kept on taking. And of course, the bearer of the “gift” was a woman. In a sense, the Ancient Greeks differed little from the Hebrews. Womankind was created to punish men, by design and by God or the gods, take your pick.  Topping the list of the attributes bequeathed the fairer sex — the innate weakness of inquisitiveness and an intense proclivity to succumb to temptation. For good measure, unbeknownst to them, the first women conceived by man were armed with weapons of mass destruction. 

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America.

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