Jay and the Giant Pension — Central Banks’ Dilemma Defined

Sometimes the shoe fits. September 13, 2016 would have marked the 100-year anniversary of British children’s author Roald Dahl’s birth. In rejecting appeals to issue a commemorative coin celebrating his life, the Royal Mint noted the author was, “associated with antisemitism and not regarded as an author of the highest reputation.” Dahl did indeed make incendiary and hateful remarks stemming from Israel’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon which Israel felt justified in undertaking, and which did in truth result in 15,000-20,000 civilian deaths. Upon learning of his stained character by his own words, that even seemed to give Adolph Hitler a pass, I resolved to move on to a theme other than Dahl which had been my first intent, for this week’s missive. It would not be one caricatured by Jay Powell careening downhill in a giant peach that laid waste to his nemeses.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website —  www.DiMartinoBooth.com

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DiMartino Booth, Quill Intelligence JONESING FOR NORMALITY

Jonesing for Normality — The Economy Goes Off Script

Ah, but to have come of age oblivious to John, Paul, George and Ringo and be too young to have partaken of that muddy, druggy rite of passage in Woodstock, NY. There was no draft and your father was likely not a World War II veteran. You may have had older brothers or sisters who protested Vietnam, but you were not burdened with that internal conflict. Your scars also differ. You cannot tell people where you were the day JFK or MLK was assassinated. And you don’t consider yourself to be “old.” That is reserved for the first wave baby boomers, who are entering their 70s at a rapid clip.

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Danielle DiMartino Booth is CEO and Director of Intelligence at Quill Intelligence LLC

For a full archive of my writing, please visit my website Money Strong LLC at www.DiMartinoBooth.com

Click Here to buy Fed Up:  An Insider’s Take on Why the Federal Reserve is Bad for America

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DANIELLE DiMartino Booth, Money Strong, Jay Powell, J-Curve

Powell & Goliath – Riding Out the Jay Curve

How goes the business of “watching the paint dry”? As boring as the Fed planned? Maybe the stormy markets and Mother Nature are in cahoots and scheming to keep winter alive and as vicious as she’s ever been. From my snowy perch in New York, I can certainly report that Mother Nature sure as heck hasn’t received the memo that Spring has arrived. And neither have the markets.

Call it the risk parity unwind. Pin it on Bitcoin’s downfall. Blame Facebook and trade tensions. But for my money, it’s all about Quantitative Tightening. Or as Nomura’s George Goncalves rightly identifies, what’s really got the markets on edge, is the triple tightening of rising LIBOR, rate hikes and QT. Tack on the European Central Bank’s intentional taper and the Bank of Japan’s inadvertent taper and it’s anything but watching paint dry.

But then, it was always naïve to assume that the diametric opposite of Quantitative Pleasing would be any fun, and foolish to believe the “watching paint dry” meme. For now, the markets are largely unconvinced that all of this tightening will come to pass, or at least that’s what surveys and stocks’ relatively good behavior convey.

The short rate market remains a might bit more skeptical. The LIBOR-OIS spread is on everyone’s radar just like the bad old days of the Great Financial Crisis. For any of you who need a refresher, just think of it as the difference between one interest rate that incorporates credit risk and the risk-free rate, as in the fed funds rate.

Wide is bad, narrow is good. At over 100 basis points, a full percentage-point-plus, the spread is at the widest since the 2007-2009 bloodbath in credit markets. The financial sector is sniffing out risk in the air. Now, some of this has to do with repatriation and a funding shortage, a technical issue that should resolve itself.

But as Citi’s Matt King points out in a short report you should try to get your hands on, the relative calm will soon be disturbed. As King explains, as soon as the Treasury stops paying out tax refunds, continued T-bill issuance will lead to an increase in the Treasury General Account at the Federal Reserve. This will in turn deplete bank reserves by the same amount. And that will reduce the available capital to conduct currency swaps, a decidedly bad thing.

Speaking of the Fed, today is a very important day for one Jerome “Jay” Powell. He will take to the podium at his first post- Federal Open Market Committee press conference. Buoyant stock markets are said to reflect rumors that Powell will wax dovish.

One thing is for sure. Much to the disappointment of those who want to exact revenge on the speculators and a special class of degenerates they refer to simply as “banksters,” Powell will not be pushing through any half-point rate hikes. He may be hawkish, but he isn’t reckless. That is not to say Powell is a pushover. As we heard him say and repeat in his recent Congressional testimonies, it is not the Fed’s duty to put a floor under stock prices.

What Powell should do is announce that press conferences will henceforth follow every FOMC meeting. This simple and elegant move would send shudders through the market but it would also give Powell the flexibility afforded by having every FOMC meeting be “live.” Besides, it’s time for the Fed to grow up. Hiding behind four meetings a year has long since outlived any utility.

For more on the challenges awaiting Powell, please enjoy this week’s installment, Powell and Goliath: Riding Out the Jay Curve

 

Hoping you’re enjoying Spring weather somewhere and wishing you well.

 

Danielle

 

 

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DiMartino Booth, Federal Reserve, Jay Powell

POWELL ON POWELL — A Deep Dive into 2012’s FOMC Transcripts

It’s official…for a second time around. At least that’s what the CNBC headline said: Fed Chair Nominee Jerome Powell Wins Approval (Again) of Senate Banking Committee. It would seem the esteemed Committee is challenged by expiration dates, which could give one pause as it pertains to dairy products and such. Though the members voted on December 5th to approve Powell’s nomination, it would seem the expiry date came and went on December 31st.

For the record, Senator Elizabeth Warren was the only committee member to vote against Powell’s nomination…again. The full Senate now has all of 16 days to confirm Powell before Janet Yellen’s term ends on February 3rd.

At the risk of stating the obvious, time could be of the essence. While it’s true that the ink has yet to dry on the acclamatory, congratulatory and laudatory approbations of the Yellen mini-era, we might not want to risk even one day without a warm body chairing the Federal Reserve Board.

According to one veteran hedge fund manager, today resembles neither 1987 or 1999. What does this say of what’s to come, of the markets’ fate? One thing is for certain. If Jay Powell is confirmed, he’s going to find out.

To say that a den of cynics lays in wait, hoping for Powell’s failure is kind. Consider the very first Twitter reply to the posting of a Business Insider article about the world’s nine wealthiest men having a combined net worth that exceeds that of the poorest four billion.

I tweeted out the following: “I’ll repeat this until I’m blue in the face. Inequality will morph from a socioeconomic to a macroeconomic issue and boomerang back with a vengeance. And I’m a proud card-carrying capitalist if there ever was one.”

The first reply: “End the Fed and all other Central Banks.”

The public, it would seem, is taking no prisoners. The gig is up that trillions upon trillions of dollars of quantitative easing have accomplished one thing – they’ve made the rich richer. Let’s be clear, that’s a gross oversimplification. But the Pavlovian and vitriolic reaction to any mention of inequality nevertheless induces howls from the masses who lay the blame for the yawning gap that’s opened up between the proverbial have’s and have not’s squarely at central bankers’ doorsteps.

Meanwhile, despite my own fears that the cryptocurrency craze could infect the FANG stocks if Bitcoin did something like halve, all seems to be fine in the major indices. In fact, as Bleakley Advisory Group’s Peter Boockvar points out, if we manage another three days without a 5% correction in the S&P 500, history will have been made, as in the longest winning streak of all time. Is it any wonder the Goldman Sachs Financial Conditions Index is at the lowest since 2000?

And yet, the long end of the yield curve seems incapable of responding with anything more than a Heisman to the insistent laundry list of reasons long-maturity Treasury yields should be rising – climbing deficits leading to greater supply, razor-thin risk premiums, producer prices bubbling over. At last check, the 10-year yield registered 2.56% to the 2-year’s 2.04%. Correct me if I’m wrong, but that 52-basis-point differential is within a hair of the flattest curve we’ve seen for the better part of a decade.

Add them up – a grassroots campaign calling for your failure, risky assets gone wild, a bond market that’s double-daring you to hike into building inflationary pressures, oh, and, just for good measure – no historic precedent. How would you like to be Jay Powell?

The good news is that Powell understands every single aspect of what’s to come. His CV suggested as much, but it wasn’t until I dove into the freshly-released 2012 FOMC transcripts that I was sure. Especially after reading his words, I reiterate my contention that Powell is no clone of any of his predecessors. With that, I invite you to enjoy the fruits of my painstaking parsing of the transcripts in this week’s newsletter, POWELL ON POWELL: A Deep Dive into 2012’s FOMC Transcripts.

A personal aside. I was able to catch up with my best friends from New York over the long weekend in beautiful La Jolla. It had been over three years. Let’s just say that was too long a stretch. Sometimes Facetime just doesn’t cut it. Do yourself a favor before the new year sweeps you away, and schedule a time to catch up face-to-face. You’ll thank me for it.

Hoping you too enjoyed your long weekend and wishing you well,

Danielle

 

 

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